An untrained dog

People don’t train their dogs because they are misguided in the belief that “(s)he is a puppy and will ‘grow’ out of it”.

People don’t train their dogs because their spouse/son/daughter/mother/father/neighbor/casual acquaintance “is a dog trainer” and will “help them if they need it”.

People don’t train their dogs because a spouse or other family member cannot come to terms with their lack of control, either over the dog, or over the training process, not understanding that failure to be able to train your own animal is in no way a reflection on your own personal shortcomings, either perceived or real.

People don’t train their dogs because they live in the country and are under the false assumption that their dog has a “right” to roam.

People don’t train their dogs because they think that dog bites from small dogs “won’t hurt that bad” nor cause much damage.

People don’t train their dogs because the dog never leaves it’s kennel run/tether/stake-out/house.

People don’t train their dogs because they like the element of fear and danger that a dog acting aggressively provides.

People don’t train their dogs because it’s assumed that all training must occur out-of-doors and the temperature doesn’t agree with their idea of “comfort”.

People don’t train their dogs because they can’t find a place to train them.

People don’t train their dogs because they are smitten by “cute” behaviors in the 10 pound pup, not realizing the ramifications in the 100 pound adult.

People don’t train their dogs because they are misguided into believing that training “will break the dogs’ spirit”.

People don’t train their dogs because they have been deceived into believing that prior abuse or neglect has either somehow altered that animals’ ability to learn or that training will emotionally ‘damage’ the dog in some intangible way.

People don’t train their dogs because they ‘don’t have the time’.

People don’t train their dogs because the dog “only poops or pees in the house once in a while”.

People don’t train their dogs because they prefer to walk them, if they walk them at all, during the time of day where they are less inclined to encounter many distractions.

People don’t train their dogs because they are overwhelmed by their other obligations to family, work, travel or social calendars.

People don’t train their dogs because they are convinced that ‘ignoring the problem(s)’ will make them go away.

People don’t train their dogs because they think that a sit at the kitchen counter while cooking a meal should translate to a sit anywhere, under any circumstance.

People don’t train their dog because they think their dog “knows better and just won’t listen”. (thanks Lynn!)

People don’t train their dogs because “We don’t want a robot”.

People don’t train their dogs because they think that training is only for dog sports, not real life.

People don’t train their dogs because they are confused by the propaganda they read on the internet, see on TV or what their mothers’ best friends’ sister-in-law told them about how a dog should or shouldn’t be trained.

People don’t train their dogs because they just don’t know where to start, how to start and what to start with.

People should train their dogs for the convenience factor alone. A trained dog is easier to be around, doesn’t cause problems publicly or in the privacy of the owners’ home, is enjoyable to interact with and affords all of the benefits of dog ownership that made you seek a dog as a companion in the first place.

Training is easy, fun, if you approach it as more of a game and less of a chore, and positive results can be accomplished in a relatively short period of time with little effort.

If any of these points speak directly to you, your answers are only an email away.